Thinking About Art Out Loud

Installation view of "Sophia Ainslie: In Person".

Installation view of “Sophia Ainslie: In Person”.

The work up in the Kingston Gallery through February 24 — paintings by Sophia Ainslie, Stacey Alickman and Lynda Schlosberg — bring to mind the current interest and the many discussions inspired by Raphael Rubenstein’s seminal article which appeared in Art in America in 2009, “Provisional Painting”, and the superb show Paint Things: Beyond the Stretcher, curated by Dina Deitsch and Evan Garza now at the deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park.

Their work is part of this ongoing conversation about the way artists both pay homage to and challenge painting and its history, and the delight in that dichotomy — for both the practitioners and viewers as well. To see a painting of enormous scale inscribed on a wall, as is the case with Ainslie’s “In Person”, and to know that it is temporary, alerts the viewer to the challenge the artist presents — in questioning the value of the work and how one is to perceive it. Stacey Alickman literally takes the detritus of a work as she recycles oil paintings by peeling the paint off of its canvas and using the resulting paint-laden chips for other projects. Lynda Schlosberg’s work is characterized by a relationship between form and formlessness — even as the work is circumscribed by relatively conventional means, acrylic on panel, she is attempting to push against what might be expected from the materials themselves.

Lynda Schlosberg and Stacey Alickman

Left: Lynda Schlosberg
Right: Stacey Alickman

 

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