Rose Olson and Karen Meninno Exhibitions Covered by Slightly Wonky

Many thanks to artist and architect Elizabeth Kostojohn for covering Karen Meninno’s current exhibition Sculpture Remix and Rose Olson’s April exhibition Light Moves on her blog, Slightly Wonky. We love her refreshingly down-to-earth take on art and life!

Karen Meninno: Sculpture Remix and Robert Maloney: Points of Intersection

 On a recent rainy Friday, I had the pleasure of visiting and considering again the current exhibits – Karen Meninno in the Main Gallery and Robert Maloney in the Center Gallery. These exhibits and Susan Scott’s show Righteous Ordinary are up through April 30 at the Kingston Gallery.

Inspired by architecture and a recent trip to Rome, Karen Meninno’s work, which gestated as small sculptural elements, has evolved to digital wall coverings, displayed as scrolls of almost hallucinatory endless patterns. At first you don’t know what you are looking at – highly decorative, jewel-like images that reflect and mirror themselves. Totems of repetition, shape and colors evocative of another culture, they become both a hybrid and a translation, from sculptural objects to repeated patterns of pure delight. Her work resonates with a strong trend in Europe and here in the States of artists working in a variety of mediums who are creating wallpaper as part of their practice. She is aware of and inspired by many of them, like Kiki Smith, who work with Studio Printworks in New York. The artist seems poised to take orders!

Robert Maloney is also interested in the city, and takes us on a wonderful ride in a postindustrial world. His pieces straddle the line between structures being torn down and those being erected, as well as the elements of modern life that go unnoticed. A recent article in the New York Times, The Poetry in the Ruins of New York speaks to Maloney’s eye and his interest in this subject, and also alerts us to what is unseen. His wall of prints of repeated images push the medium, and explore a place, which becomes, through the treatment of the materials themselves, something new and knowable. A highlight of the exhibit is one of the small evocative sculptures, situated in a high corner, attached to the ceiling, which further explores the edges and disregarded parts of our urban environment.  These seem to be an especially strong new direction for the artist, and one that this viewer hopes he continues to follow, bringing his viewers with him.

Sophia Ainslie and Mira Cantor at Northeastern University

Sophia Ainslie's work at Northeastern University.
Sophia Ainslie’s works on paper at Northeastern University.

 

 

 

 

Mira Cantor's work at Northeastern University.
Mira Cantor’s paintings at Northeastern University.

Sophia Ainslie and Mira Cantor are in a three-person “Faculty Focus” exhibition curated by Bruce Ployer at the 360 Gallery, Northeastern University, Boston, through April 17. More information here: http://www.northeastern.edu/northeasterncreates/gallery360/currentexhibit.html

Mary Bucci McCoy on the Guerrilla Girls and Boston in Art New England

ANE_Guerrilla_Girls

Mary Bucci McCoy‘s column, “Museums — More Than Getting the Numbers Right” appears in the March/April issue of Art New England. The article considers the Guerrilla Girls’ fall 2012 action targeting the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in the context of earlier Guerrilla Girls actions and the responsibilities of museums.

Sophia Ainslie in Conversation With Curator Leonie Bradbury

Sophia Ainslie (left) in conversation with Montserrat College of Art curator Leonie Bradbury.
Sophia Ainslie (left) in conversation with Montserrat College of Art curator Leonie Bradbury.

Last night during Beverly’s First Thursday Art Walk, Sophia Ainslie spoke about her current exhibition Interstitial to an audience of Montserrat students, faculty, and visitors with curator Leonie Bradbury. Seated in front of her wall painting “Fragments – Wall – Montserrat”, Sophia spoke about the development of her current body of work as a way of processing her mother’s illness and death, the evolution of her wall paintings, and future directions for her work.

Karen Meninno Interview on ArtScope’s Blog

mennino
State House Spaceship, digital photographic C-Print, 36 x 24″.

Meredith Cutler interviews Karen Meninno on the development of the work for her exhibition “Sculpture Remix” (at Kingston through April 28), the relationship between her two- and three-dimensional work, and her thoughts on cities real and imagined as someone born in New Delhi, raised in London and now living outside of Boston.

http://blogspot.artscopemagazine.com/2013/04/karen-meninno-sculpture-remix-at-kingston-gallery/

Review of “Sophia Ainslie: Interstitial” on Artfetch.com

Sophia Ainslie — Fragments - Wall - Montserrat, latex on wall, 2013
Sophia Ainslie — Fragments – Wall – Montserrat, latex on wall, 2013

Sophia Ainslie‘s exhibition Interstitial, on display through Saturday, April 6 at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, MAwas reviewed by Kingston’s Emerging Artist Member Céline Browning on UK-based blog Artfetch.com: http://www.artfetch.com/edition/075/freeze-framing-a-hurricane/.

The public is invited to a reception for Interstitial on Thursday, April 4, 6–8 pm, which will include a gallery talk by Sophia and curator Leonie Bradbury from 6–6:30 as part of Beverly’s First Thursday Art Walk.

Last Week to See Our March Shows

On a recent visit on a lovely Friday afternoon to Kingston Gallery, Rose Olson’s paintings were still glowing. How these works are perceived is so dependent on the light, time of day and where one is in the space in relationship to the work.

This exhibition and the other two are up for one more week, through March 30. Congratulations are in order for Rose Olson, Haruyo Nakanishi and Susan Alport, as we have had many visitors and great response to the work. Something came to mind when looking at the Center Gallery’s Paper Dialogue.  How do works of art, these mute objects, speak? And how do they speak to each other? The materials, color, forms, and technique are all elements that allow this to happen, but it is also the dialogue that can occur between the objects. That certainly is happening in the Gallery this month.

Two neighboring shows are very much worth mentioning, as they are stand out exhibitions in themselves and also are in dialogue (in this viewer’s opinion), both in terms of form and content, with Kingston Gallery. They are Catherine Kernan’s exhibition After Images: New Woodcut Monoprints at Soprafina Gallery and Ann Pibal’s Los Dos at Steven Zevitas Gallery.

A visit to 450 Harrison Avenue is in order — all these exhibitions are harbingers of spring, and are a powerful reminder that artworks made of paint, ink, wood, and paper act as mirrors: they reflect back, revealing us to ourselves.