ELBOW ROOM CHAT

Jennifer Moses’ Elbow Room: An Interview in Images with Linda Leslie Brown

Jennifer Moses’ quizzical, layered paintings are packed with physical and conceptual content. They also manage to pay homage, in ways both straightforward and sly, to a panoply of artists -some of whose work you may recognize below. Elbow Room, her show on view this month at Kingston, is a visual feast you won’t want to miss.

I met Jennifer for coffee recently to talk about her work, in an extension of an ongoing discussion we’ve carried on over the years. So, we sat around over at Nero the other morning talking about our art heroes and influences, of whom we have several in common.

Here’s one of Jennifer Moses’ works:

-1.jpgJennifer Moses  Bird on Wire 33×30 oil on panel

And one of my wall pieces

nutt-house
Linda Leslie Brown Nutthouse 2016 mixed media

We decided to conduct our discourse in images…

“First, she said, there’s…

440px-gorky-the-liver

…And don’t forget

matteo-di-giovanni

Do you know this one?Sassetta_-_The_blessed_Ranieri_frees_the_poors_from_a_jail_Florence_-_Louvre.jpg

We have to mention  picasso_nudeinanarmchair1929  of course.”

And it seems both of us have a permanent Resident in our studios:

guston-studiophilipgustonweb1975lg

Well, that started a flow of images…murray2450

th   the-weeping-woman

richard_tuttle_the_triumph_of_night_320x240

larger-copy

…as well as images of flow…

101000-coping

until I came out with

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which started us both laughing. We could go on and on with this!

So I’ll leave it to you, Readers, to search out further references like these in Jennifer Moses’ paintings and collages at Kingston Gallery this November.

See you at Elbow Room!

-LLB

Friendship and Creativity: Beauty Squared

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A glimpse of the opening reception for “I Know Just What You’re Saying” at Kingston Gallery on January 8. To the left, springs eternal, a lovely porcelain piece by Christina Pitsch.

This month at Kingston is all about the value of artists influencing and supporting each other. Our current exhibition, I Know Just What You’re Saying, is an all-members effort and a game of “telephone” made visual. While its concept opened selections up to chance and some improvisation, the final result is elegant and thought-provoking. It’s up until Sunday, January 31.

In a lovely case of kismet, a former Kingston artist member, Richard DeVeau, wrote an article on Medium about the fellowship of artists, including his time at Kingston Gallery. The piece primarily focuses on artwork and friendship linking artists Amedeo Modigliani and Chaim Soutine in the first half of the 20th century.

DeVeau writes, “Given the number of portraits they painted of each other, especially the number of times Modigliani painted Soutine, it’s clear they were best friends. Their studio/living spaces were in the same building. And they had a lot of time to talk with an easel between them.”

One of the best things about Kingston Gallery, that’s not always apparent to even a frequent visitor to the exhibitions, is the lively chaos in the form of witty banter and passionate dialogue between members at the monthly  meetings. Kingston IS its artists. As DeVeau mentions in his article, it is one of the oldest artist-run galleries in the nation.

It’s no secret that creativity increases when we share ideas, whether directly related to a body of work, generally about art-making, or about life in general. Earlier this week, a friend and former student, Jessica Yvonne Lewis, posted on Facebook:

Do you have to make art consistently to be an artist? Can you be a creative person without a visual element involved? Do you need people to see it for it to mean something? What about conversation? What about how you see and interact with the world?

As is often the case with contemporary art, the questions are more interesting than the answers. Lewis is based in Portland, Oregon. Find her on Instagram @furrawnyvonne.

Finally, in case you missed it, an all-too-relatable cartoon, What Do You Do? by Jack Sjogren on Hyperallergic.

In Case You Missed It: Greg Lookerse

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An aerial view of Greg Lookerse’s recent exhibition, Everything is God to Me and Everything is Dust to Me, at Kington Gallery.

Greg Lookerse‘s solo exhibition, Everything is God to Me and Everything is Dust to Me, at Kingston Gallery from December 2-27, concluded his experience as the gallery’s Emerging Artist in 2015. His exhibition demonstrated a compelling balance of craftsmanship and philosophical inquiry.

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Greg Lookerse at his performance,  when all the ice in the world melts maybe it will leave a beautiful mark, in conjunction with Kingston’s September 2015 exhibition, All Natural.

Inspired by books by Annie Dillard and Teilhard de Chardin, (find details on our website), Lookerse created a space where he regularly performed a ritual of teaching a stone to talk. Within the hexagonal structure, he papered the gallery floor with pages from Dillard’s book, Teaching a Stone to Talk. The gallery lights fell upon the pages layered in a grid so precisely arranged that it precluded any question of whether, by taking the book apart and putting the pages on the floor, he may mean any disrespect. Rather, the pages suggested an invitation to read the book in an alternative way, as though we may be able to enter the space to scan the entire text at once. Over time, the pages became covered in spatters of black ink, obscuring the words and providing visual traces suggesting the many times the artist lifted the stone from where it sat in a vat of ink. He also marked each attempt to teach the stone with small ticks on a calendar.

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Installation view, Everything is God to Me and Everything is Dust to Me, Kingston Gallery, December 2015.

Accompanying this arrangement was a series of altar stones (stones carved to contain a mixture of charcoal and raw honey), displayed in glass cloches. To provide further background into his thoughts, Lookerse’s artist statement is also in this post.

Ambitious, thoughtful, and talented, Greg often provided a voice of calm clarity among the membership. We wish him the very best in his promising career.

Artist Statement

Everything is God to Me and Everything is Dust to Me

My work is always inspired by literature. As an avid reader I often find the need to explore the author’s ideas in a less narrative and more visual manner.

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Altar Stone, 2015, stone, charcoal, raw honey, glass cloche

This series of sculptures and durational performance space form a body of work that continues my practice of contemplating literature.
Teilhard de Chardin wrote, “Everything is God to me; everything is dust to me…” in his book The Divine Miliue. As the driving concept behind this body of work the paradoxical notions of faith and doubt collide. To the devoted theologian a rock with black honey may stand for a symbol of a god’s providence, a miracle, or perhaps a god itself. To the skeptic it is just a stone with honey in it.

The most fascinating part of this dichotomy is that both views find meaning in the stones; whether because of a transcendent interpretation or because of an aesthetic transformation.
In a similar narrative, author Annie Dillard describes a man living on an island who keeps a small stone under a piece of leather on a shelf. When he is alone he performs a ritual to teach the stone to talk. In her book Teaching A Stone to Talk she reflects upon this ritual:

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Altar Stone, 2015, stone, charcoal, raw honey, glass cloche


“I assume that like any other meaningful effort, the ritual involves sacrifice, the suppression of self-consciousness, and a certain precise tilt of the will, so that the will becomes transparent and hollow, a channel for the work. I wish him well. It is a noble work, and beats, from any angle, selling shoes.”

Perhaps materials and items hold transcendent meaning. Perhaps they are simply things human beings can mold or shape. Either way, the actions and rituals we perform with these objects changes us and our perceptions of them. The cell is ready for me to enter and the materials are waiting.

-Greg Lookerse, 2015

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Alter Stones, 2015, stone, charcoal, raw honey, glass cloches.

A Quick Q&A with Susan Emmerson

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Susan Emmerson, Flesh and Bone, ink and acrylic on cut and molded Tyvek, wire, extruded plastic, 28 x 51 x 4 inches, 2015.

Associate Member Susan Emmerson divides her time between Boston and Chicago. Her first solo exhibition at Kingston Gallery, “Around a Thousand Tiny Corners,” just ended in May, but she’ll be show work from another series in a exhibit at Kingston in August.  I recently caught up with her to talk about her work.

SDG: My mom and brother are surgeons, and so I am especially fascinated by how your experience as a surgeon inspires your work. You speak of your art as a type of translation. How does your piece Flesh and Bone translate into biological terms?

SE: I began Flesh and Bone when I noticed the strong resemblance of melted white Tyvek to the inner structure of bone, and began to try to reproduce the appearance of other body tissues.

Susan Emmerson, Visible Absence, acrylic on cut Tyvek, 48 x 48 inches, 2015.

Susan Emmerson, Visible Absence, acrylic on cut Tyvek, 48 x 48 inches, 2015.

SDG: How about all of the colors-are they direct or more metaphorical?

SE: I used organic colors found inside the living human body: subdued reds, yellows and browns. The drawings are based on various cells and parts of cells, and I included partially hidden features to give the illusion of looking inside the body.

SDG: That explains the complex textures that I find so appealing. How about this other piece that appears dramatic on Kingston’s grey walls, Visible Absence?

SE: In Visible Absence, I use forms based on the structure of the lymphatic system, with tiny vessels interconnecting seemingly random clusters of lymph nodes. I called it Visible Absence to emphasize that these structures are almost imperceptible in our own bodies and function more or less without our knowledge unless something goes wrong. The shadows that form behind the piece serve to emphasize this illusory quality.

SDG: What a gorgeous way to bring to light information that we typically can’t even sense, let alone see. Would you say your art is a metaphor for the body at work?

SE:  The abstract shapes share many qualities with live organisms: flowing, expanding, growing, repeating and proliferating.

You can learn more about Emmerson’s work at her website, susanemmerson.com, and see more of her work this August at Free Association 2015: Kingston Associates’ Annual Exhibition, from August 5 to 30, 2015.

visible absence detail

Detail, Visible Absence, as installed at Kingston Gallery in May 2015.

Gallery Artists’ News

The second half of 2014 was as busy as the first for Kingston Gallery’s artists! We are happy to share what our artists have been up to:

Ilona Anderson currently has work in Imaginal/Imagining The World (organized by Deborah Davidson, Suffolk University Gallery Director) at the Adams Gallery, Suffolk Law School. The exhibition runs through January 25.

Kathleen Gerdon Archer was a finalist for the Photolucida Critical Mass awards. Photolucida is an arts nonprofit based in Portland, Oregon whose mission is to provide platforms that expand, inspire, educate and connect the regional, national, and international photography community.

Linda Leslie Brown Co-Host Ceramic, metal, plastic, paper clay 13 x 9 x 9 inches 2013

Linda Leslie Brown — Co-Host, ceramic, metal, plastic, paper clay, 13 x 9 x 9″, 2013

Linda Leslie Brown has been awarded a 2015 Traveling Fellowship from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She had a new environmental work in copper wire and crystal, Indra’s Drala Net, installed as part of the Kingstown RI Land Trust Sculpture Trail, and she currently has work in Imaginal/Imagining the World Imaginal/Imagining The World at the Adams Gallery, Suffolk Law School. (See Ilona Anderson, above, for full details).

Judith Brassard Brown’s painting, Frontline, was purchased by NYU’s School of Professional Studies in New York, NY. She had work in the group exhibit Faculty and Students of Montserrat College of Art and Endicott College at the Rocky Neck Cultural Center, Gloucester, MA during the month of October, and also during October she exhibited work at New England BioLabs in Ipswich, MA.

Mary Bucci McCoy is now represented by Gray Contemporary in Houston, TX and CG2 Gallery in Nashville, TN. Her work was included in an exhibition of work by gallery artists, Aloe Vera, at Gray Contemporary in August and also was featured in a two-person show with the British painter Erin Lawlor, Long Loud Silence, in September and October at the gallery. Reconfiguring Abstraction: Lisa Russell and Mary Bucci McCoy was on view at the FPAC Gallery in South Boston in August and September. Mary was the Visiting Critic for the fall semester at Montserrat College of Art’s Senior Fine Arts Seminar. She has work in a group exhibition of work by gallery artists at Gray Contemporary, Houston, TX through January 17.

Conny Goelz-Schmitt had work in Bibliophilia at Nave Gallery Annex, Somerville, MA during the month of October. Also during October Conny also had work in Time Travelers at Cambridge Arts Association, Kathryn Schultz Gallery, Cambridge.

Julie S Graham had work in the Salon Show at the Clark Gallery, Lincoln, MA in November–December.

 the space between, hand embroidery on re-appropriated linen, 50 x 72", 2012

Joetta Maue — the space between, hand embroidery on re-appropriated linen, 50 x 72″, 2012

New member Joetta Maue spoke at the event With Thread in Hand, a program celebrating the historic and vital art of embroidery, at The Atwood House Museum in Chatham, MA in November. Also in November Joetta had work in Narcissism and The Self-Portrait at the Ann Street Gallery in Newburgh, NY. She had work in The Personal is Political, at the Slater Concourse Gallery, Aidekman Arts Center, Tufts University, Medford, MA in November and December. Joetta gave an informal talk within the context of the exhibition Vessels at the Nave Gallery Annex in Davis Square in December.

Jennifer Moses was an artist in residence at Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, NY for the month of July. She had work in the summer-long exhibition Surface, Strokes and Light, a group exhibition of of contemporary painters and sculptors at Kelly Roy Gallery. Broadsided Press displayed a collaboration between Moses and poet Annie Finch on the Cape Cod Public Bus Transit in the summer through September.

Rose Olson had work in Postscript: A Selection of Work from the Gallery Artists and the Director’s Collection at Hutson Gallery, Provincetown, MA in September and October . She had a group of small works on display in October at Susan Maasch Fine Art, Portland, ME, and currently has work on display there in Gallery Artists: Group Exhibition at Susan Maasch Fine Art, through February.

Christina Pitsch — Flora of Fauna Porcelain 21” x 21” x 5” 2013 [photo: Millyard Studios]

Christina Pitsch — Flora of Fauna, porcelain, 21” x 21” x 5”, 2013
[photo: Millyard Studios]

New member Christina Pitsch has work in Beasticon II at Mark MIller Gallery, 92 Orchard Street, New York, NY. The exhibition runs through January 15.

Lynda Schlosberg is guest juror for Chroma, a national juried exhibition of work on hue, saturation and value at Gallery 263 in Cambridge, MA. The exhibition will run January 15 – February 14, 2015. She has work in Gallery Artists: Group Exhibition at Susan Maasch Fine Art, Portland, ME through February.

Elif Soyer had work in the annual exhibition Ekim Gecidi (The Passage of October) at the Canakkale Museum of Ceramics in Canakkale, Turkey in October and November.

Ann Wessmann had work in the group show Earth to Heaven at Spoke Gallery @ Medicine Wheel Productions, South Boston from September to November.

Luanne E Witkowski’s works on paper and selected paintings were featured at Hutson Gallery, Provincetown, MA during the summer and she had work on display there in Postscript: A Selection of Work from the Gallery Artists and the Director’s Collection in September and October. She also had work in Trans-Alternate: artists, social practitioners, and voices seldom heard from Nepal: Art and Social Practice – Call and Response at Godine Family Gallery, Mass. College of Art and Design, Boston, MA in October.

 

Ground Cover

Multistory

We are looking forward to the panel discussion Abstraction and Contemporary Art: Curator William Kaizen with Peter Kalb (author of “Art Since 1980: Charting the Contemporary”) and Martha Buskirk (author of “Creative Enterprise: Contemporary Art between Museum and Marketplace”) on Saturday, September 13, 4–5 pm.  This is the first event in the Second Saturday series organized by the Boston Art Dealers Association and is in conjunction with the current exhibit Ground Cover. Hope to see you there!

Image: Julie Graham, Multistory, Plaster, wood, paintings on panel, 69 x 10 x 9 inches, 2012.

 

 

Call for Artists – Deadline: September 25, 2014

Kingston Gallery

Kingston Gallery is seeking at least two new artist members this fall. The gallery is governed and run by dues-paying, exhibiting artist-members and showcases a diverse range of contemporary art in a mutually supportive environment that encourages experimentation and growth. Gallery exhibitions receive attention in both print and online publications including Art New England, ArtScope, Big, Red & Shiny, Boston Globe, The Weekly Dig, as well as on our Facebook page and blog, Thinking About Art Out Loud.

Full gallery members are offered a solo show every two to three years in the Main gallery and a solo show in the Members’ gallery (a small space for new or experimental work) in alternate years. Membership responsibilities include attendance at monthly meetings, staffing the gallery once per month, helping with the ongoing running of the gallery and dues of $110/month. (A one-time commitment fee of $200 is payable upon acceptance as a member.)

We welcome artists living and working in Greater Boston to apply for membership. Membership is quite competitive, with new artist-members being selected by a majority vote.

All applications must include:

  • Name/Address/Telephone/E-mail
  • 10 jpegs — 72 dpi, less than 1 MB  (15 if details or installation shots are included) numbered to correspond with:
  • identification sheet listing title, media, dimensions and date completed for each work
  • resume
  • artist’s statement

Submissions can be made electronically in two ways:

a) Creating a Google drive folder including all application materials and sharing that folder with submissions@kingstongallery.com or

b) Emailing all materials to submissions@kingstongallery.com

Hard copy submissions should be sent to:

Kingston Gallery
450 Harrison Avenue, #43
Boston, MA 02118
Attn: Director

and should include a CD with images, and supporting documents either separate or included on the CD. If submitting hard copy, include a self-addressed, stamped envelope if you want your materials returned.

Deadline: September 25, 2014

For more information, visit www.kingstongallery.com or call (617) 423-4113