Photographic postcards from Mary Lang

Mary Lang recently visited Oregon, and one of her destinations was the Columbia Gorge Model Railroad Club in Portland, where she took a number of photos. This doesn’t mean that model trains are a full-blown obsession of hers…yet.

As she said to me, “I’m not sure I’m doing a project on model railroads necessarily, but I’m interested enough to follow this thread.” Lang had always heard about the Columbia Gorge club, and this visit provided her a great opportunity to play around, have some fun, and follow her intuition. It would not be the first time that one of Lang’s photographic series evolved from focusing on something that was interesting, without exactly knowing what would come of it.

As is evident from the images above, the models as Lang shot them involve her longtime focus on the landscape. As miniature built environments, they bring to mind the traces that people leave in sites familiar to them, such as the tiny trucks parked just so, and to alterations made to the land in order to sustain routine, such as bridges joining two facing embankments.

Photographers often become recognized for specific aspects of their craft: the cropping, the timing, the lighting. Lang’s photography embraces stillness. The stillness that she captures with her lens is a type of attention that magnifies what we see to the degree that it seems as though she invented the textures, colors, and contours that shape her subjects.

You can learn more about Mary Lang at her website, www.marylang.com, and find her on Instagram @marystuartlang.

All Natural: A Conversation with Al Miner

Installation view, All Natural, Kingston Gallery, September 2015. L-R art by Christina Pitsch, Mary Lang, & Kathleen Gerdon Archer.

Installation view, All Natural, Kingston Gallery, September 2015. L-R art by Christina Pitsch, Mary Lang, & Kathleen Gerdon Archer.

Last week, I met with Al Miner at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he works as Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art. He curated our current exhibition, All Naturalfeaturing Kingston member artists Kathleen Gerdon Archer, Mary Lang, Greg Lookerse, and Christina Pitsch. Each artist examines humankind’s attempts to commune with, control, or contain nature. The exhibition includes a broad representation of media, including photography, sculpture, and performance.

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Greg Lookerse, Two Fish Cut Into Five Thousand Piees, #1, edition of 10, archival inkjet print.

It didn’t take long for me to see that, although Miner says he’s not obsessed with landscape, it holds some fascination for him and, well, for all of us. “It’s a theme that clearly spoke to artists throughout time,” Miner said. Landscape paintings are among the most popular works in the Museum, he said, which is part of why he curated the long-term exhibition, Landscape, Abstracted, on view from August 2014 through July 2017. It includes an immense (24 x 80 feet) mural by Jason Middlebrook that Miner says has become “selfie central.” The point of the exhibition, he said, was to give examples of how artists today are not bound by the same constrictions as artists were in the past. There are so many contemporary takes on landscape, and artworks including Jason Middlebrook’s mural, green chenille beanbag “Topia Chairs” by Barbara Gallucci, and a site-specific installation made with thread and staples by Anne Lindberg demonstrate just how far they can abstract nature. They use color and pattern, among other visual tactics, to respond to the museum’s architecture, while simultaneously evoking nature and seizing upon natural phenomena.

When I inquired about Miner’s own interactions with nature and how they might influence his thinking he said, “I’m curious about whether anything real still exists,” Miner said. He does not want to camp, hike, or otherwise immerse himself in the outdoors. Really, he just wants sit outside at a cafe with a beverage and a piece of cake in the sunshine. That still feels like an authentic outdoor experience, especially if you’ve previously been in a windowless space and/or staring at a computer screen before arriving at said cafe.

“With this group of artists at Kingston,” Miner said, “I found that all four artists were making compelling and consistent bodies of work.”  From there, he realized that all four of them dealt with nature, but with boundaries, compromises, and constructs.

I Am A Century Wide, 2015, 24 x 24 inches, polypropylene print mounted on Sintra under plexiglas, 1 of 10

Kathleen Gerdon Archer, I Am A Century Wide, 2015, 24 x 24 inches, polypropylene print mounted on Sintra under plexiglas, 1 of 10

Kathleen Gerdon Archer employs alchemy (turning water into ice, then ice back into water), using her own power to transfer elements from one state into another state.

Mary Lang compares dioramas of state parks with actual state parks. First, there is the issue of the gates, stairs, and other fixtures that may be meant to protect the park, but also alter the original landscape. Then there is the contrast of being intrigued by a real place, but realizing it isn’t real.

Greg Lookerse’s performance, Two Fish Cut Into Five Thousand Pieces, exaggerates the rules and constructs we follow when we interact with nature. Photographs documenting the performance are part of the exhibition, along with works from his Honey Storage series, where he folded cut paper from the book The Great American Forest, by Rutherford Platt, into honeycomb shapes. Lookerse, like Archer, alludes to the attraction of alchemy in his work.

Near Moutlton Falls, WA, 2015, archival digital print, 20 x 30 inches.

Mary Lang, Near Moulton Falls, WA, 2015, archival digital print, 20 x 30 inches.

Christina Pitsch created clear trophy mount deer heads with cast plastic, sewn vinyl, and sheet acrylic. “They become empty vessels, sucking out the meaning we expect from taxidermy,” said Miner. Pitsch employs her own clean and symmetrical aesthetic to interrogate why we hang something like a hunted and killed deer in an interior space.

Miner appreciated the depth and prolonged exploration evident in each artist’s work. Presented together, viewers become aware of the way all four artists manipulate natural elements, sometimes leading audiences in one conceptual direction, only to complicate our notions of this subject matter with an unexpected conclusion or eschewing one at all, but rather allowing nature’s mysteries to remain unsolved. They also remind us of how far we may have come from having a direct relationship with nature.

Postcard of Christina Pitsch, Fragments of Love and Desire: Loveletter, taxidermy deer hoof, ribbon, 19

Postcard of Christina Pitsch, Fragments of Love and Desire: Loveletter,
taxidermy deer hoof, ribbon, 19″ x 8″ x 7″

Miner is now working on a large group exhibition for the MFA entitled “Megacities Asia,” which examines the way artists in some of Asia’s most quickly expanding cities respond to the urbanization around them with found object practices. One thing that has become clear to him as he works with artists based in Seoul, Beijing, Shanghai, Mumbai and Delhi, is that, as he puts it, “being “green” is a luxury.” For instance, there is not yet a vibrant green movement in China. Citizens of Asian megacities experience natural spaces in more limited and different contexts, and, as the whole world is urbanizing at a staggering rate, we may soon experience nature this way ourselves. Will every city of the future incorporate green space? Is it and should it be important to every culture or not? Can they build green spaces indoors, or by maintaining a view of the horizon from the upper floors of a high-rise building reinforce a fading connection to the natural world? The artwork Miner included at Kingston raises these and other questions, too. Further, the MFA exhibition will be staged not only inside the Museum’s galleries, but also outdoors. Both exhibitions make it clear that contemporary conversations about landscape are as much about being human as about relating to nature.

Installation View, All Natural, Kingston Gallery, Sept. 2015. L-R Greg Lookerse, Mary Lang, Christina Pitsch.

Installation View, All Natural, Kingston Gallery, Sept. 2015. L-R Greg Lookerse, Mary Lang, Christina Pitsch.

Slow Down

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Mary Lang’s recent photographs alert us to the world, or more precisely the world as perceived by the artist and mediated through the lens of her camera. She is bound to this world, these landscapes. We see as she does, places of great beauty, from a distance. They situate the viewer both in and out of the frame. They hold us and diminish us. That they are all digital prints (she notes her first such exhibition) is evident, but not essential to the way they are composed and presented. The images are idealized; a sense of yearning and a predominance of green are twinned throughout. In this moment in our culture of over-saturation of images, especially digital ones, Lang’s photographs invoke places out of time. The spaces are for the most part emptied out, even when there are figures or some evidence of a human presence. They alert us to stop and consider what we are seeing. They quietly say: Look. Look here. Look inward. See what’s there.

There will be a gallery talk on Saturday, November 29 at 4 pm. The exhibit runs through November 30. Don’t miss the show!

Image: Mary Lang, Clouds and mountains, Machu Picchu, Archival pigment print, 20×30 inches, 2013.

 

 

Kingston Gallery Artist News

Kingston Gallery artists have had a busy first half of 2014:

Stacey Alickman — Lost Year, oil on canvas, 48 x 42", 2014

Stacey Alickman — Lost Year, oil on canvas, 48 x 42″, 2014

Stacey Alickman received the 2014 Blanche E. Colman Award.

Ilona Anderson has work in Pipe Dreams, Wishful Thinking, Grand Gestures & Dirty Lies at ASC project space, 526 West 26th Street, Room 304, New York, NY through July 15. Ilona also has work in the group exhibition As | Orchard opening July 31, Lower East Side, NY.

Kathleen Gerdon Archer and Barbara Moody were named Co-directors of Kingston Gallery for 2014. Kathleen Gerdon Archer and Conny Goelz-Schmitt both had work in the group exhibition Synchronicity at the Associazione Culturale Rosa Venerini (ACRV) in Viterbo, Italy from June 27 – July 6. They spent the month of June at the Associazione Culturale Rosa Venerini (ACRV) Residency Program.

Judith Brassard Brown is exhibited in The Power of Suggestion at Gallery Alpers Fine Art in Andover, MA from January 15 – March 22. For more information visit www.alpersfineartonline.com. Judith is now also represented by Art in Giving, www.artingiving.com. This non-profit organization provides a creative way to raise funds for research for the prevention and cure of childhood cancer.

Linda Leslie Brown and Luanne E Witkowski both had work in a group show at AMP: Art Market Provincetown, 148 Commercial Street, which runs June 25 – July 9.

Mary Bucci McCoy was interviewed by the 365 Artists 365 Days project.

Mira Cantor is teaching at the Burren College of Art in Ireland during the month of July.

Julie Graham was in the group show Small Works at the Ruth Bachofner Gallery in Santa Monica, CA, November 30, 2013 – January 11, 2014. She also had a solo show Topoanalysis at the Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery at Montserrat College, Beverly, MA, May 28 – June 27.

Mary Lang’s had a one-person retrospective exhibit, Like Water, at the Trustman Gallery at Simmons College, March 17 – April 17. The exhibition was reviewed by Mark Feeney in the Boston Globe.

Barbara Moody taught a new studio intensive course entitled Expressive Interpretations of the Landscape, at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, MA in both January and July. She exhibited her photo-collages March 17 – May 7 in a three-person exhibition at the Albright Gallery, in Concord, MA. And she and Ann Wessman both have work in Dreaming Gardens at Suffolk University Gallery, 75 Arlington Street, Boston, MA, which runs June 10 – August 22, curated by Deborah Davidson.

Jennifer Moses showed her work in a group exhibition of 12×12 paintings at the Oxbow Gallery in North Hampton, MA, December 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014. She has work in the summer long exhibit Surface, Strokes and Light, a group exhibition of of contemporary painters and sculptors at Kelly Roy Gallery. Broadsided Press is displaying a collaboration between Moses and poet Annie Finch on the Cape Cod Public Bus Transit through September. Jennifer is also an artist in residence at Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, NY for the month of July.

Rose Olson will be featured at Hutson Gallery, 432 Commercial Street in Provincetown, July 25 – August 7. She also has work in Danforth Art Museum’s Community of Artists Annual Juried Exhibition, which runs June 8 – August 3.

Lynda Schlosberg had a solo exhibition Field of Potentiality in the Spencer Presentation Gallery at the Walter J. Manninen Center for the Arts, Endicott College, Beverly, MA, January 28 – March 20. She was the featured gallery artist at Susan Maasch Fine Art in Portland, ME for the month of March. And her work was included in Painting Intricacies, curated by Resa Blatman at Nave Annex Gallery in Somerville, MA, April 18.

Luanne E Witkowski’s mixed media works were included in a group exhibition in the President’s Gallery, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, December 9, 2013 – January 23, 2014.

Congratulations to Mary Lang on the review in The Boston Globe by Mark Feeney!!

At Simmons, ‘Like Water’ for spirit

By Mark Feeney

Water dominates this planet. Light dominates photography. So what’s the relationship between water and light? Well, it’s ambiguous. Water can’t quite make up its mind about light. It reflects light. It also lets light in. It’s mirror and lens, and to at least some degree a distorting lens, to boot. Back and forth, up and down, in and out: From that duality, all sorts of arresting visual effects arise.

For a decade, Mary Lang has been photographing water: as river, ocean, puddle, cloud, droplet; between banks, along beaches, in parking lots, on windows; in Auburndale, on the Cape, by the Oregon coast, in the Andes. Variety of type and location is one of the attractions of water as camera subject. It’s not quite as ubiquitous as light, but it’s found in numerous forms all over the Earth even as it always remains the same: good old H2O.

In photographing water, Lang has said, she seeks “something intangible, impermanent, and luminous.” Those qualities are all evident in “Like Water.” These are quiet pictures. Lang’s waves don’t crash; they flow. One can more easily imagine her water evaporate than cascade or inundate. The power of water is there, but it has no need to call attention to itself.
It’s up to each viewer to decide whether those qualities Lang seeks take a form that’s more spiritual or strictly visual. Lang’s consistent ability to present color in a handsome, unemphatic way conduces to either interpretation. The images create their own sense of reality, not so much flirting with abstraction as inviting it in for a chat. Attractive as these photographs are, they are anything but pretty. Don’t expect to find them on a calendar or postcard. Not that there’s anything wrong with calendars or postcards. But staying up to date and tracking road trips are the furthest thing from Lang’s mind. That old putdown, “Hey, you’re all wet”? Lang shows that it might also be considered a compliment.
Image: Mary Lang’s “Near the Pump House, Auburndale, MA”
WATER: Photographs by Mary Lang

Trustman Gallery, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, 617-521-2268. http://www.simmons.edu/trustman

Closing date: April 17

Mark Feeney can be reached at mfeeney@globe.com.

 

Mary Lang at the Trustman Gallery

esplanade-boston-2007_rdax_354x253

Don’t miss KIngston Gallery member Mary Lang’s exhibit “Like Water” at the Trustman Gallery.  http://www.simmons.edu/trustman/exhibits/index.php

Below is from the gallery website:

“Simmons College presents Like Water: Photographs by Mary Lang from March 17 – April 17 at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, Main College Building, 300 The Fenway in Boston. A reception from 5:30-7:30 p.m. will be held on Wednesday, March 19; Mary Lang will present an artist talk at 6:00 p.m. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. For ten years, Mary Lang has used water as a vehicle for her exploration into the impermanent and intangible. Her meditative and chimerical works of uncertain scale and place allow one to pause and draw a long breath. The photographs, with views of reflections of clouds, detritus on water or the beading of water on a window screen, are disorienting in their ephemeral quality. They are composed with edges not defined – what is reflected or “real” becomes tricky. We just don’t know. Yet they draw us in with their calm beauty. Her C-prints abstractly mirror the world. These photographs are a bridge to the ineffable. They seem out of time and place. As a photographer Lang is rooted in the world – yet her subject matter seems not to be about physical description, but rather a sense of wonder and a release of the ego into a larger and more mysterious place. The Lunchtime Lecture Series will continue in the Gallery on April 1 from 12:30-1:30 p.m. with Assistant Professor Kristin Dukes of the Psychology Department. The subject of her talk is Discerning Eye: Social Psychology of Perception Trustman Gallery hours are 10 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Gallery is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268.”

Last week for the December exhibits

The three exhibits up this month: Mira Cantor: Meltwater, Carmelo Midili: Fragments and Mary Lang: Inhabitants will be on view through Sunday, December 29. Gallery hours are Wed–Sun 12–5. In addition there will be special Public Relations hours with Deborah Davidson on Tuesday, December 24, 2–4 p.m. NOTE: the gallery will be closed Wednesday, December 25.

We will usher in the New Year with Luanne E Witkowski’s exhibit IV, Mary Mead: Heads: New Prints and Susan Alport: Give/Take opening January 2. We look forward to seeing you at the First Friday reception on January 3!!