Kingston Gallery Artist News

Kingston Gallery artists have had a busy first half of 2014:

Stacey Alickman — Lost Year, oil on canvas, 48 x 42", 2014

Stacey Alickman — Lost Year, oil on canvas, 48 x 42″, 2014

Stacey Alickman received the 2014 Blanche E. Colman Award.

Ilona Anderson has work in Pipe Dreams, Wishful Thinking, Grand Gestures & Dirty Lies at ASC project space, 526 West 26th Street, Room 304, New York, NY through July 15. Ilona also has work in the group exhibition As | Orchard opening July 31, Lower East Side, NY.

Kathleen Gerdon Archer and Barbara Moody were named Co-directors of Kingston Gallery for 2014. Kathleen Gerdon Archer and Conny Goelz-Schmitt both had work in the group exhibition Synchronicity at the Associazione Culturale Rosa Venerini (ACRV) in Viterbo, Italy from June 27 – July 6. They spent the month of June at the Associazione Culturale Rosa Venerini (ACRV) Residency Program.

Judith Brassard Brown is exhibited in The Power of Suggestion at Gallery Alpers Fine Art in Andover, MA from January 15 – March 22. For more information visit www.alpersfineartonline.com. Judith is now also represented by Art in Giving, www.artingiving.com. This non-profit organization provides a creative way to raise funds for research for the prevention and cure of childhood cancer.

Linda Leslie Brown and Luanne E Witkowski both had work in a group show at AMP: Art Market Provincetown, 148 Commercial Street, which runs June 25 – July 9.

Mary Bucci McCoy was interviewed by the 365 Artists 365 Days project.

Mira Cantor is teaching at the Burren College of Art in Ireland during the month of July.

Julie Graham was in the group show Small Works at the Ruth Bachofner Gallery in Santa Monica, CA, November 30, 2013 – January 11, 2014. She also had a solo show Topoanalysis at the Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery at Montserrat College, Beverly, MA, May 28 – June 27.

Mary Lang’s had a one-person retrospective exhibit, Like Water, at the Trustman Gallery at Simmons College, March 17 – April 17. The exhibition was reviewed by Mark Feeney in the Boston Globe.

Barbara Moody taught a new studio intensive course entitled Expressive Interpretations of the Landscape, at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, MA in both January and July. She exhibited her photo-collages March 17 – May 7 in a three-person exhibition at the Albright Gallery, in Concord, MA. And she and Ann Wessman both have work in Dreaming Gardens at Suffolk University Gallery, 75 Arlington Street, Boston, MA, which runs June 10 – August 22, curated by Deborah Davidson.

Jennifer Moses showed her work in a group exhibition of 12×12 paintings at the Oxbow Gallery in North Hampton, MA, December 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014. She has work in the summer long exhibit Surface, Strokes and Light, a group exhibition of of contemporary painters and sculptors at Kelly Roy Gallery. Broadsided Press is displaying a collaboration between Moses and poet Annie Finch on the Cape Cod Public Bus Transit through September. Jennifer is also an artist in residence at Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, NY for the month of July.

Rose Olson will be featured at Hutson Gallery, 432 Commercial Street in Provincetown, July 25 – August 7. She also has work in Danforth Art Museum’s Community of Artists Annual Juried Exhibition, which runs June 8 – August 3.

Lynda Schlosberg had a solo exhibition Field of Potentiality in the Spencer Presentation Gallery at the Walter J. Manninen Center for the Arts, Endicott College, Beverly, MA, January 28 – March 20. She was the featured gallery artist at Susan Maasch Fine Art in Portland, ME for the month of March. And her work was included in Painting Intricacies, curated by Resa Blatman at Nave Annex Gallery in Somerville, MA, April 18.

Luanne E Witkowski’s mixed media works were included in a group exhibition in the President’s Gallery, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, December 9, 2013 – January 23, 2014.

Last week for the December exhibits

The three exhibits up this month: Mira Cantor: Meltwater, Carmelo Midili: Fragments and Mary Lang: Inhabitants will be on view through Sunday, December 29. Gallery hours are Wed–Sun 12–5. In addition there will be special Public Relations hours with Deborah Davidson on Tuesday, December 24, 2–4 p.m. NOTE: the gallery will be closed Wednesday, December 25.

We will usher in the New Year with Luanne E Witkowski’s exhibit IV, Mary Mead: Heads: New Prints and Susan Alport: Give/Take opening January 2. We look forward to seeing you at the First Friday reception on January 3!!

“Mira Cantor: Meltwater” Reviewed on Big Red & Shiny

Many thanks to Big Red & Shiny for their review of “Mira Cantor: Meltwater”!

Slippery Slope

Slippery Slope — oil on canvas, 48 x 36″, 2012

From the review:

“‘Meltwater’ and Cantor’s previous series [‘Silver Lake’ (2005), and ‘White Paintings’ (2008)] reveal her kinship to American landscape painters. Thomas Cole (1801-1848) created a native landscape vision which emphasized America’s unique natural heritage.5 In The Course of Empire (1832), Cole interpreted the extinction of glorious nations. Cole described Old Age in the Voyage of Life cycle (1840): ‘The stream of life has now reached the Ocean to which all life is tending.’6 With her passionate concern for sustainable life, Cantor continues in Cole’s legacy of cherishing the preciousness of nature. Cantor says that, in addition to the weather, she also thinks about death, which we cannot escape. ‘I want to know my world and alert people to it… And change will happen. The ice is melting. In a painting I can stop time.’7 The monumentality of Cantor’s minimalist forms is awe inspiring. The technical aspects of her painting style make palpable the slow transformation of our planet’s environment. A dynamic synergy between Cantor’s sweeping gestures, her control of the defined edges, and the way she allows the paint to function independently are what make the Meltwater series so compelling and demanding. When confronted with her work, we are immediately engaged with the profound implications of what we see.”

Read the full article here.

“Mira Cantor: Meltwater” will be on view through Sunday, December 29. Gallery hours are Wed–Sun 12–5. In addition there will be special Public Relations hours with Deborah Davidson on Tuesday, December 24, 2–4 p.m. NOTE: the gallery will be closed Wednesday, December 25.

 

Boston Globe Review of “Mira Cantor: Meltwater”

Thank you to Cate McQuaid for her review of “Mira Cantor: Meltwater” which appeared in The Boston Globe Wednesday, December 18:

Installation view

Installation view

“Icy Truths: Mira Cantor’s glacial landscape paintings in ‘Meltwater’ at Kingston Gallery are not huge, but they are expansive and generous. Cantor eloquently lets the paint’s textures mimic the surfaces of water, ice, and mountain. Her cool, luminous colors feel charged with energy. Massive forms seem to quiver, as if on the verge of dissolution.

Purple Majesty, oil on canvas, 48 x 36"

Purple Majesty, oil on canvas, 48 x 36″

‘Purple Majesty’ sets a peak beneath a periwinkle sky. Along one side, it’s shadowy lavender above icy blue-white. Slick white outlines the other side. But in between, the white thins to rivulets and drips, and the center vanishes into a gray abyss.

The paintings, with their monumental forms, verge toward abstraction. The title piece depicts a flat iceberg, mauve and tamped with pale, drippy orange, floating in a still, green-black sea. A thick frost of electric aqua green edges the berg beneath the water. That edge is no boundary. It’s a threshold, through which light and form passes into blackness.

These are cautionary images about climate change. But they’re extraordinary paintings, perilously active, filled with color, light, and texture, yet spare in composition. Marvel, and beware.”

“Mira Cantor: Meltwater” will be on view through Sunday, December 29. Gallery hours are Wed–Sun 12–5. In addition there will be special Public Relations hours with Deborah Davidson on Tuesday, December 24, 2–4 p.m. NOTE: the gallery will be closed Wednesday, December 25.

Contradicting Beauty

Image

Last Wednesday a group of thirty attendees had the pleasure of hearing Mira Cantor talk about her current show at Kingston Gallery, Meltwater. She began by stating that there are two things which are certain: death and the weather. She then discussed the ideas she ponders in regards to her practice, many of which are contradictory, but all equally embodied in the paintings.  Although she feels she is addressing a crisis in nature, a clear affinity for the materials at hand was apparent.

She has a love of landscape and a terror of that landscape. The work is about the water rising, but they are also beautiful images, making them unsettling, ambiguous. They are visual descriptions of mountains, but instead of offering the viewer a sense of looking outward, they are claustrophobic and disorienting. They are about the majesty and the demise of the mountains simultaneously. They alert us to issues of climate change, but with no solution or morality. Instead of being a clear representation, Cantor tries instead to express the essence of her experience. There is an economy of color and form as well as an importance of the surfaces; she uses a range of viscosities – allowing the forms to undo themselves.

Cantor derives her imagery from a specific locale, but she strives for something more universal; the paintings are an abstraction of that place.  Clearly, the influence of some of the artists she grew up with, Willem DeKooning and Marsden Hartley, makes itself apparent in this body of work, and like them, in the end, the work is all about the paint.

Image: Mira Cantor, Spector, oil on canvas, 40 x 32″, 2013

Upcoming Exhibition — Mira Cantor: Meltwater

Mira Cantor — Meltwater, oil on canvas, 48 x 60", 2013

Mira Cantor, Meltwater, oil on canvas, 48 x 60″, 2013

MIRA CANTOR: MELTWATER
Main Gallery
December 4-29, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, December 6, 2013, 5-7:30pm
Gallery Talk with Mira Cantor: Wednesday, December 11, 2013, 6pm
SoWa Holiday Stroll: Wednesday, December 11, 2013, 4-9pm

 

BOSTON, MA – November 2013, Kingston Gallery is pleased to present Mira Cantor’s first exhibit with Kingston Gallery, in its Main Gallery from December 4 – December 29, 2013. A reception for the public will be held in the gallery on Friday December 6, from 5:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Mira Cantor is an artist who thinks profoundly about the world. This current body of work, Meltwater, tries to “freeze” the moment of the viewer’s encounter with the landscape into a fusion of perceiver and perceived in an attempt at stopping time. We want to hold on to the power of the sunset on the mountainside but we also must let go, as it is fleeting. In this way, we can face death. Cantor’s work continues to explore the boundaries of landscape and how juxtapositions of mountain forms, light, and air shift those boundaries. Her mountains are both monuments to life and references to tombstones.

Cantor has explored and developed this interest in landscape since her 1999 exhibit Rhyme and Reason, focusing on sand, sea and the line in-between. In 2005, with her exhibition Silver Lake, she looked at nature as a cross-section, slicing through it vertically like an architectural elevation. She describes the surface of the landscape as a topology of marks, a map with clues about man’s interference with it. At a 2010 residency in Banff, Alberta, Canada, her perspective of mountain landscapes left her with a sense of claustrophobia and disorientation.

The artist says: “What we observe through marks in the terrain mark our own temporal boundaries through our lifetimes. In the light of the recent hurricanes and global catastrophic weather occurrences, I am particularly aware of global warming and the melting of our glaciers. From the mountains flow the rivers that bring life to the world. Will the melting of our ice fields reform the landscape into new modes of connections, or will this slow destruction and deterioration overcome us, terminating civilization, as we know it? Meltwater is an attempt to dwell in the beauty of our natural resources and at the same time, become palpably aware of their demise.”

Mira Cantor was born in New York and graduated with an MFA from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. From 1978 to 1980, Cantor was a Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT. She was awarded a Fulbright to Alexandria, Egypt in 1994 where she taught and exhibited at the American Center. Her solo exhibitions include the Tokyo American Center in Japan, BWA Gallery in Krakow, Poland, Gallery Lohrl, Düsseldorf, Germany, Hampshire College Gallery, MA, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, MA, Fitchburg Art Museum, MA, Contemporary Art Museum in Honolulu, and three solo exhibitions at the Genovese-Sullivan Gallery in Boston -1999, 2002 and 2005. Her drawings have been exhibited in biennales in Vienna, Norway, Yugoslavia and Poland. She is in many private and public collections across the U.S. Ms. Cantor lives and works in Boston and is a Professor of Art at Northeastern University.

Showing in the Center Gallery: Carmelo Midili: Fragments

Showing in the Members’ Gallery: Mary Lang: Inhabitants

NEW Gallery Members at Kingston

By Linda Leslie Brown

In Boston, the new year begins not in January but in September. This is especially true in the art world, where September shows are eagerly awaited and fresh work arrives in the galleries to inspire, perplex, challenge or bore us unspeakably for another season.

Kingston Gallery is part of this ritual of renewal with its annual members’ show, Gifted. Visitors to the gallery this September have noted the inclusion of work by a group of artists who are new to the Kingston stable: Stacey Alickman, Kathleen Gerdon Archer, Mira Cantor, Julie Graham, and Lynda Schlosberg. I found that in the Gifted show, the work of these new artists has added an enhanced richness of color and texture to our visual mix.

The work of these artists is diverse and vividly realized, exhibiting a wide variety of conceptual perspectives and technical practices. What unites them is their commitment to the ongoing development of their creative vision. Their work will have a significant impact on the intellectual environment of the gallery, and we’ve selected them specifically to participate in ongoing dialogue with us.

I’ve asked each of them to respond to a few questions in pursuit of this theme as a way of introducing them and placing their work in context.Their responses are intriguing, and we’re looking forward to seeing their ideas take shape in the upcoming shows of their work we’ll be presenting at Kingston.

Linda Leslie Brown (LLB): What is your take on being a new member of Kingston Gallery? How do you think your work fits into the mix?

Mira Cantor: I am delighted to be in Kingston Gallery as a NEW member. I believe it is a good fit as I am sitting here in the gallery looking at all the members’ work.The show was curated well and I think we are all fortunate to have Deborah Davidson with us handling the PR. It’s been a long time since Genovese Sullivan closed and I feel connected again to the street. Thanks for inviting me. Some of the members are old acquaintances and friends; others I hope to get to know. It’s exciting to be part of the group and look forward to seeing all the interesting work.

Mira Cantor

Mira Cantor

Julie Graham: I’m honored to be a new member of Kingston Gallery. I’ll show in the members’ gallery in March 2014 where I’ll install a new project that combines multiple elements of my interdisciplinary practice. I’m not yet sure what form it will take, but I will explore some ideas that have been percolating for some time. I’m happy for the opportunity.

Julie Graham

Julie Graham

Kathleen Gerdon Archer: For me Kingston Gallery has always been at the top of the list of galleries which show exciting, inspiring and thoughtful work. This gallery is less motivated by commercial success than it is by freedom and experimentation. I feel my work will be pushed in new directions as a result of frequent interactions and conversations with the other artist members.

LLB: What’s happening in your studio these days? Are you beginning a new direction or expanding on some ideas that have been in development for some time? What are you most excited about in your work today?

Stacey Alickman: I’m most excited to be exploring more nuanced kinds of texture. Not just impasto and ridges but also something that is the perception of texture rather than just texture itself. I am finding new inspiration in current work by sanding down the paint in order to build up lines again while allowing for previous layers to come through.
I’m also still developing paintings for the purpose of “breaking” in order to get the paint off its canvas. Once the paint is free of its ground, I can use these chips, front and back, for future compositions. I am thinking about using these chips for a large wall installation at Kingston in 2014.

Stacey Alickman

Stacey Alickman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lynda Schlosberg: I am currently expanding on ideas that have been in development for quite some time. My focus in the studio now is on finding ways to expand on my mark making and new ways of combining and layering the marks to achieve a certain level of visual density and complexity that is characteristic of my work.

While visiting the Danforth Museum’s “Off the Wall” exhibit this summer, I saw several artists with grid and network references in their work. I was already being drawn towards the idea of the grid and began wondering how I might go about introducing something similar into my work. Historically my marks have consisted of interwoven layers of repeating patterns of dots and dashes signifying a sea of vibrating particles of energy, yet I have been becoming more curious with the underlying system that connects all of this vibrating energy together which has led me to the notion of the grid. The grid I envision however is not a rigid system; it is fluid and pervasive, it is an optimum state between chaos and order.

My investigation with the grid is still in its infancy. I have started by working with cheesecloth, soaking it in paint and imprinting it onto the surface. The cheesecloth begins with a uniform structure, but quickly changes form as soon as I apply paint to it and reshape it before pressing it onto the panel. I am going back in and painting over the intricate mesh with different layers of color, breaking up the grid while maintaining part of its original structure. I have yet to finish the first piece using this new technique, so the jury is still out if it will be successful or not, but I’m excited to be working with these new marks.

Lynda Schlosberg

Lynda Schlosberg

Mira Cantor: My new work will be shown in the December slot.The landscapes are in a state of demise due to the variation in the viscosity of paint, which metaphorically references global warming.The show will be called MELTWATER.

The new work is derived from two recent experiences. I was an artist in residency in May in Banff, Canada and I spent the month of July teaching at the Burren College of Art on the west coast of Ireland. Both were total immersion of me in the landscape looking at nature very close up and with great vistas. I had also been in Banff in 2010. Immersion into the landscape seems to inspire and motivate my desire to paint. I started using oil paint again in 2010 which I stopped using in graduate school. Oil felt like I was more in touch with natural elements instead of the plastic quality of acrylic. It also enables me to do things with oil, turp and varnish that I cannot accomplish with acrylic. I do wear a mask when I paint which I do not need with acrylic. I think my work has become more quirky and fluid since my last series. I don’t know if that has to do with the material change or age.

Kathleen Gerdon Archer: I am at the beginning of a new body of work that takes a different form but is consistent with themes I often explore. As before, I will use a series to tell a story with literary references. The work has been haunting me for three years and has finally developed into a whole. I can’t wait to show it.

LLB: How do you go about developing new work? Do you have a process of experimentation, inspiration, and change? How do you know when the work needs to take off in a new direction?

Stacey Alickman: In the past couple of years, I’ve been layering oil paint over extended periods of time, often putting it on then taking it off. At some point, the physical aspects of the paint assert itself and I am no longer controlling the outcome. The paint wills itself into a composition that is not of my ideas but something hopefully more transcendent. Lately, I’m more open to the possibility of not knowing what the work is about. A painting I can live with is one that results in an end that couldn’t have gone any other way.

Julie Graham: I’m interested in unexpected and unplanned collisions of ideas, forms, color and architecture — things and places that are normally overlooked, and things that don’t really seem to belong. I consider myself a painter, but I also make 3D pieces (I’m not sure if they are sculpted paintings or painted sculptures) and photographs.The processes of construction are similar throughout, as I build layer upon layer to mirror the way I see the world around me.

Lynda Schlosberg: The desire to expand on my mark making vocabulary and layering is twofold. One is of a semi-practical nature; since my work is very time consuming to produce I’m always looking for new ways to achieve the same visual intricacy with less. The second is on expanding the personal dialogue I am having with quantum theories, and the introduction of new marks and techniques is fueled heavily by what I read on the subject.

Right now I’m in the middle of reading “The Field” by Lynne McTaggart, which has introduced me to the ‘Zero Point Field.’ To oversimplify: there are lingering fluctuations in the Universe’s sub atomic energy field even at temperatures of absolute zero—which is where everything should be completely void of any motion. This ceaseless energy implies that nothing ever really dies completely, that all things that ever existed still exist, and that they are intricately and forever connected through The Field. It is this ‘connection-of-all-things’ that intrigues me, and the idea of an energetic grid that is the mechanism holding it all together.

Kathleen Gerdon Archer: By constantly taking photographs I eventually understand what it is I am interested in seeing. A pattern of like images develop, and once recognized, can be expanded upon. The images reflect what I have been feeling even if I am not aware of that as I am shooting. The years it takes can be frustrating but the stories eventually develop and become clearer to me as I write my statement, a critical component of the work.